farmstory

Highveld Mushrooms, the largest privately owned mushroom farm in Africa, endeavors to improve mushrooms taste, quality and production standards continuously through always investigating the latest technology while complying with various food safety programmes.

Our team of directors who assist in leading the farms and employees to continually improve and grow, whilst delivering the best mushrooms possible, include:

Ross RichardsonGroup Managing Director
Highveld Mushrooms:  John HeritageProduction Director and Pheann du ToitSales Director
Meadow Mushrooms: Baring RichardsonProduction Director
Medallion Mushrooms: Tim CrawleyManaging Director

The story behind Highveld Mushrooms

2011
Purchased a majority stake in Medallion Mushrooms in Stellenbosch Western Cape.

2006
Chris’ youngest son Baring was appointed as Production Director for the Meadow Farm.

2000
Investment began into the new state-of-the-art environmentally and efficient compost yard and tunnels for better mushroom quality and lower environmental impact. Highveld Mushrooms can proudly claim the title of being one of the most technologically advanced mushroom growing facilities in the Southern Hemisphere and has maintained this until today.

1998
Highveld Mushrooms procured a second farm in the Vaal district, called Meadow Mushrooms, bringing the total production to about 60 tons per week. At this stage the farm supplied all major retailers under the Highveld brand, since then however the retailers have consolidated suppliers into their house brands, of which Highveld is still an active supplier.

1997
Chris’ eldest son Ross, now Managing Director, joined the business.

1986
Chris Richardson purchased Colin Jacobson’s shares to become the sole owner.

1980
Not long after the production came online the demand for processed mushrooms fell and Highveld moved to producing predominantly fresh product.

1979
Highveld Mushrooms was started by Chris Richardson and Colin Jacobson with plans to supply the mushroom processing industry. At this stage the farm produced 4 tons of mushrooms per week, supplying a frozen mushroom processor and it was the first farm in South Africa not to use horse manure in the mushroom compost, but only chicken manure and other additives.